Podcast: Susie Bodnar on the CSCMP and the New Directional Shifts in Supply Chain

Requis

It’s not just about procurement or warehousing, we go all the way to reverse logistics. At the start of the pandemic, all of my warehousing friends were saying that the warehouses were full of things like paper products. As an educator, Susie has been an adjunct lecturer of supply chain management for the Executive MBA program at California State University in Fresno. Susie Bodnar is part of the generation that is driving supply chain innovation forward.

This Week in Logistics News (April 4-8, 2016)

Talking Logistics

Manhattan Associates Empowers Warehouse Managers With New E-Commerce Capabilities. On Wednesday Amazon announced “the expansion of Prime FREE Same-Day Delivery to even more metro areas including Charlotte, Cincinnati, Fresno, Louisville, Milwaukee, Nashville, Raleigh, Richmond, Sacramento, Stockton, and Tucson, plus new areas in Central New Jersey, Dallas-Fort Worth, Los Angeles, and San Diego.”

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This Week in Logistics News (February 4-8, 2013)

Talking Logistics

Net revenues from “other logistics services,” which include transportation management services, customs, warehousing, and small parcel, increased about 15 percent in Q4 2012 (excluding contribution from acquisition), driven primarily by transaction increases in its transportation management and customs services. The vehicles have a range of up to 75 miles and primarily will deliver packages to customers in Sacramento, San Bernardino, Ceres, Fresno and Bakersfield.

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Tens of Thousands of New Jobs, and One Worry: Robots

Supply Chain Nation

This week: Warehouses have hired tens of thousands of California workers over the last five years, but there’s one worry: robots, more companies, including Target, are rolling back on loyalty programs, Walmart eliminates a few dozen corporate jobs, Staples may be planning to spin off its retail business to Office Depot and hundreds of people showed up for a chance to pack and ship products to Amazon customers. A typical Amazon warehouse job pays $13 or so an hour. warehouses.

Tens of Thousands of New Jobs, and One Worry: Robots

Supply Chain Nation

This week: Warehouses have hired tens of thousands of California workers over the last five years, but there’s one worry: robots, more companies, including Target, are rolling back on loyalty programs, Walmart eliminates a few dozen corporate jobs, Staples may be planning to spin off its retail business to Office Depot and hundreds of people showed up for a chance to pack and ship products to Amazon customers. A typical Amazon warehouse job pays $13 or so an hour. warehouses.

Van and Reefer Rates Drop, in Mid-July Lull

DAT Solutions

For example, look for rates to rise in Fresno instead of L.A. , Reefer freight volume is building in Fresno , so look for rates to trend up there, even as volume and rates decline in L.A. Outbound rates continue to rise in Elizabeth , NJ, close to warehouses, the East Coast’s largest sea port, and farms in the more rural areas of the Garden State. The typical July lull began last week, which is a little later than expected.

Demand Heats Up for Vans and Reefers

DAT Solutions

Fruit and vegetable harvests in New Jersey, combined with refrigerated food from warehouses, answered the July 4th weekend demand for grocery items. Reefers were very active in Central California last week, as well, with increased volume from Fresno and a boost to outbound rates in Sacramento. There were lots of loads moving at higher rates last week, especially for vans and reefers.

Reefers Gain Momentum, Especially in Georgia

DAT Solutions

Atlanta was a super-hot market for reefers as well as vans, thanks to all the seasonal produce leaving refrigerated warehouses and food processing plants. OTHER) HOT MARKETS - Outbound volume and rates picked up in Fresno , which may signal a belated improvement in Central California's produce yields. Georgia beat out Texas to become the number-one state for reefer loads last week, with California as a distant third.